Predicting Success in a Graduate Psychology Program

Dr. S. Thomas Kordinak*, Dr. Melanie Kercher**, Marsha Harman J***, Dr. A. Jerry Bruce****
* Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology and Philosophy, Sam Houston State University.
** Ph. D in Psychology, Sam Houston State University
***-**** Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology and Philosophy, Sam Houston State University.
Periodicity:May - July'2009
DOI : https://doi.org/10.26634/jpsy.3.1.187

Abstract

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Tests and GRE advanced Psychology (PSYGRE) Test were correlated with several measures of success in our graduate program at Sam Houston State University including some specific courses.  Significant correlations were obtained for several of these measures, but the PSYGRE provided incremental validity over and above all the GRE scales. However, the best prediction is accomplished with scales from both tests.  The recommendation of the present report is that both tests should be used in the admission process and that each department should engage in validity studies related to their admission process.

Keywords

GRE, Psychology, Graduate, Master, Doctoral.

How to Cite this Article?

Dr. S. Thomas Kordinak, Dr. Melanie Kercher, Marsha Harman J and Dr. A. Jerry Bruce (2009). Predicting Success in a Graduate Psychology Program. i-manager’s Journal on Educational Psychology, 3(1), 63-70. https://doi.org/10.26634/jpsy.3.1.187

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